Gnosis Retreat Center | Inspired by the legacy of R.D. Laing
Suppose you come to the end of your tether, can no longer cope, have a break-down, fall apart, go to pieces. To whom would you turn? Where would you go?
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By Connor Tindall The goal of this paper is to distinguish between two very different approaches to the treatment of people going through psychotic episodes. I have termed these two approaches “being with,” and “doing to.” I have chosen these terms in part because they are broad but also because I believe that they capture the two basic premises that treatment of psychotic states proceeds from, as well as the basic idea of how one should carry oneself when working with people in extreme states. The approach of “doing to”...

by Michael Guy Thompson, Ph.D.   Kingsley Hall was the first of Laing’s household communities that served as a place where you could live through your madness until you could get it together and live independently. It was conceived as an “asylum” from forms of treatment — psychiatric or otherwise — that many were convinced were not helpful, and even contributed to their difficulties. Laing and his colleagues, including David Cooper and Aaron Esterson, leased the building from a London charity and occupied it from 1965 to 1970. The house...